Welcome to my world

Thanks for visiting my web space. I'm typically going in so many directions that I don't have time to create content for this site. However, I can offer some odds and ends that would otherwise be spinning cold and lonely in the black void of my hard drive. Feel free to look around. — Greg Raven


“The conclusion is thus inescapable that the history, concept, and wording of the Second Amendment to the Constitution of the United States, as well as its interpretation by every major commentator and court in the first half-century after its ratification, indicates that what is protected is an individual right of a private citizen to own and carry firearms in a peaceful manner.”

Report of the Subcommittee on the Constitution of the Committee on the Judiciary
United States Senate, 97th Congress, Second Session (February 1982)

“The right of a citizen to bear arms, in lawful defense of himself or the State, is absolute. He does not derive it from the State government. It is one of the high powers delegated directly to the citizen, and is excepted out of the general powers of government. A law cannot be passed to infringe upon or impair it, because it is above the law, and independent of the lawmaking power.”

Cockrum v. State, 24 Tex. 394, at 401-402 (1859)

“An unconstitutional act is not law; it confers no rights; it imposes no duties; affords no protection; it creates no office; it is in legal contemplation, as inoperative as though it had never been passed.”

Norton vs. Shelby County, 118 US 425 p. 442 (1886)

"The maintenance of the right to bear arms is a most essential one to every free people and should not be whittled down by technical constructions.”

State vs. Kerner, 181 N.C. 574, 107 S.E. 222, at 224 (1921)

“… a government and its agents are under no general duty to provide public services, such as police protection, to any particular individual citizen.

“The duty to provide public services is owed to the public at large, and, absent a special relationship between the police and an individual, no specific legal duty exists.”

District of Columbia Superior Court and the D.C. Court of Appeals issued in 1978 and 1981